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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 286 (some duplicates have been removed)
to a cato institute that puts the average pay of a government worker at $84,000 per year. that's 32,000 more dollars than the average pay in the private sector i mean, these numbers are starting to be overwhelming ad certainly have to be part of what is, if you will, and more positive response to these right to work issues and votes that we are seeing across the country. >> i think that's right. and it steves group, the manhattan institute, has an extra very worth pointing at the differences, but you're right. taxpayers a beginning to realize this monopoly power that unions have over government which is the new frontier for them what the final frontier is really causing a rift between the rank-and-file workers in the ivate sector who have to pay these taxes for increased government and the rank-and-file workers in the public sector that are enjoying these benefits. it can't go on, and that was the battle in wisconsin, part of the baatle in michigan. lou: you cited a 2010 study in which you talk about the population growth of the right to work states. we are watching union states, usually hig
to collective bargaining rights, if power of collective bargaining for government workers. this is theoretically a less divisive issue. in wisconsin the president stood nearly silent. in michigan the president goes there the day before this mass demonstration and fires up the crowd. that didn't sound like a middle class tax relief outing, that sounded like the president firing up the base ahead of a day of maas demonstrations. alisyn: as you point out, chris, two years ago when this came up with wisconsin, the president basically said that's a state issue. he talked about it when asked in interviews, but he didn't prompt the conversation himself like he did yesterday. is there any talk in washington that by weighing in on this he ginned up the protesters, even inadvertently of what's happening now that we see? >> well, he sure didn't hurt the turnout. he sure didn't hurt the ardor for the union side, and that's by giving it his complicit blessing the day before and talking about this stuff. you know, michigan, what that state representative was talking about there, there will be blood, talking a
of their money to the federal government without raising tax rates which we believe will harm our economy. >> all right. this is perhaps the most disappointing development of the day. the house republicans, they were not elected to raise either rates or revenues. they were elected as a check and balance against president obama's reckless deficits and his reckless debt. they were elected to stop the explosive growth of government. the republicans were elected and sent to washington to fight for limited government, balanced budgets, and of course, greater liberty for all the american people. at this moment it seems like they are only offering a democratic light version for america. maybe they need to learn a thing or two from president obama. maybe they need to show a willingness to go over the so-called fiscal cliff. now, if the president really wants to take the country there, maybe they need to let him go there. here's the bottom line. what are we hearing from the white house? we're hearing the president will not negotiate unless taxes are raised on job creators, and we're hearing that the presi
on a philosophy grounded in limited government, the free market and the judeo-christian tradition and this should be attractive to young and old black and white male or female voters. the most important thing is that we not despair. the problems we face today are no worse than the ones conservatives faced in the 1970 os when remember they had to deal with a weak economy and aggressive soviet union and the fallout from vietnam. they overcame those problems and they changed the world for the better. we can do the same. and that's the memo. now on to the top story tonight. the president's refusal to budge in negotiations with the g.o.p. on fiscal cliff talks. joining me now university of chicago booth school of business professor and former chairman of the council of economic advisors under president obama, dr. austan goolsbee. dr. goolsbee, where is the stethoscope? come on, i see it there hello, good to see you, austin. >> hey, laura great to see you again. i painted the pictures why conservatives should figure it out and not be in despair. on the other side of the equation you have the president.
of just 2.5% in the u.s., 1.5% in canada and zero growth in the uk. locally, cutbacks in government spending weighed on the numbers and lower commodity prices also impacted on cash flow and the government is facing more criticism about its effort to keep the budget in surplus while the economy grows. >> the government has had the objective of making sure that we would bring our budget back to surplus when growth has been around trend. what we've been seeking to do through good budget policy has been to provide maximum flexibility to the reserve bank to a just rate so. the government will always put in place appropriate budget settings which will support growth and jobs. >> still, analysts say growth could slow further as the mining investment boom peaks. yesterday, the bank of australia cut interest rates to a record low of 3% and traders are looking further easing next year to offset the falling talks of trade, the high australian daughter and further cutbacks in government spending. >> despite that prognosis for rates and the fact that we're now matching the record lows here, the
is in the south and that population is also in the need of services. the government hasn't included both in the delivery of services as well as the governments of the country the people of the north and although we have implemented programs in the north unless there is a connection between the government and individuals, the programs are not going to have the effect of people feeling as though they are a part of society. and so, there was an effort planned over the last couple of years where the development partners in tandem with the government, the central government would deliver resources to the north again with a government out in the lead and with the donors supporting. unfortunately, the pace of that was too slow and not very effective. another point moving forward i think is that we do need to concentrate on decentralization and making a connection between the government services and the individual what the community level. >> to build further on the comments about the resource base within the mali clearly there are difficult choices for the government there that are involved in
of government positions at a military airport on the outskirts of the capital. this internet video appears to show destruction after heavy fighting in damascus suburbs that until now have been government strongholds. as syria restricts access to journalists, the video cannot be independently verified. clashes have erupted in egypt as the country's constitutional crisis deepens. tens of thousands of protesters broke through police lines and surrounded the complex. demonstrators are angry over morsi's emergency powers decree and accuse his party of drafting a new constitution here the protests are the largest since the uprising that toppled hosni mubarak almost two years ago. for more on the situation in cairo, we go live to our correspondent. what more can you tell us about the situation in the egyptian capital? >> i do not know if you can hear it in the background -- this is in front of state television, a demonstration. we have another massive demonstration at tahrir square, and for the first time, people demonstrating in front of the presidential palace in the north of the city. there wa
. >> they called for a national dialogue as both pro-am and anti-government forces gathered. they said they will decide whether to attend the talks. >> this comes ahead of a visit scheduled for saturday for a new constitution that the opposition says is it too was promised. -- too islamist. >> protesters preparing to breach the barriers. the president and the muslim brotherhood have alienated many egyptians saying the government does not reflect the country's diversity. egypt is too big for you to be president, says one sign. in tahrir square, people were injured after the gunman opened fire. this enraged many demonstrators. >> they attacked us from all sides. 13 or 14 people were injured including a young 13-year-old boy. >> these protesters refused to be intimidated. they planned to hit the streets in protest of saturday's planned constitutional referendum. they believe the constitution was pushed through by his islamist allies and they want to postpone the vote. >> all of these barriers here are not enough to keep 1 million revolutionaries from continuing their protests. >> morsi's
" activists claim that they have video showing the syrian government has already used chemical weapons against its own people. remember the red line? that is what the white house called it. is this a propaganda or escalation of the civil war? what does it mean for us in that is ahead. potential breakthrough in the fight against a deadly kind of cancer. doctors say they used a form of h.i.v. to beat this young girl's leukemia. another problem for apple maps. today we take you to a town where town leaders say using apple maps could kill you. you would be surprised. that is all ahead unless breaking news changes everything. this is "studio b." first from fox at 3:00 in new york city, we know the identity of the navy seal who died in the dangerous hostage rescue in afghanistan. here he is, officials confirmed he was 28-year-old from pennsylvania, a member of the navy seal team six. the same group that killed osama bin laden. the mission this weekend was to rescue a doctor from colorado. he was doing humanitarian work in afghanistan when the taliban kidnapped him last week near the border with paki
. the borrowing cost for state and federal governments would rise, and with it the borrowing cost for businesses and that could impact the economic recovery. in terms of the debt, there are various things we have heard consistently. the do not think any movement over the cliff, where there is a slope or a cliff, whatever you want to call it, is acceptable, and they're worried about borrowing costs. host: north carolina. chris. go ahead. caller: i have had a small business for many years, and in the beginning i took -- i did not take paychecks. finally, 20 years later i met the point where i could sell it, and a mix somewhere around $185,000, and my husband makes about $60,000. with the selling of my business, should i be rushed because of taxes to sell it before december 31? guest: one of the challenges in dealing with small businesses from washington is there is a wide range of business owners. you are like the vast majority in terms of the amount of money that you earn each year. what you see is different members of congress and the administration coming -- struggling to come up with policies
safely and watch out for highway robbers and the government. that's my "2 cents more." that is it for tonight on "the willis report." thank you for joining yes. don't forget to record the show with you cannot get his life. have a great night. we will see you right back here tomorrow. ♪ one -- lou: good evening, everybody. president obama today said that two weeks may not be enough to avoid going over the fiscal clef . i've won't add my voice tonight to those who say mr. obama actually wants to take us over the cliff. it is my view that not enough has been made by the national median of the fact that it will be the president's decision and his alone that we all go cliff diving if, indeed, we are to go cliff diving. it is a decision that is cleerly , unequivocally, and unreservedly his to make. president obama has created the condition that must be met. to avoid the clothes and the dive. only he can judge whether his condition is reasonable and whether it has been reasonably met. the republican congressional leaders are at best supporting opposing players in the obama
in a state, the federal government can't recognize those marriages. that's where you talked about federal benefits heterosexual couples get and same sex couples do not. the prop 8 thing is bigger. while potentially it's confined to the state of california only, the question it out there having given the right to gay marriage could the state then take it away through proposition 8 passed by a majority of the vote nurse 2008. having taken that case, the court could get to the bedrock issue. can any state refuse to let same sex couples get married under the federal constitution. it could potentially be narrow or very far. >> pete, as i understand it, let me ask you. this one of these things, maybe the driving one, is defense of marriage act was about paying the estate act. where one of the two people said she didn't have to pay the estate tax because a married couple wouldn't have to. >> reporter: this is a case from new york. a woman named edie windsor who married her partner in canada. the partner died and left edie the estate. the federal government said we can't recognize you as married.
losses were concealed to avoid a government bailout. the complaints were filed with u.s. regulators, including the securities and exchange commission. >> the three alleged deutsche bank miss valuable to $12 billion in losses during the years 2007 through 2009 at the height of the global financial crisis. deutsche bank says the accusations are wholly unfounded. work has started on a major natural gas pipeline that critics say will deepen europe's dependence on russian gas. president putin was on hand as they began digging for the south stream pipeline. >> to augment supplies already flowing into germany. europe already receives 40% of its natural gas from russia. german investment and technology will be playing a key role in the project. >> it is a victory for russian president vladimir putin. they looked on as the first segments were welded together in western siberia. it is three weeks since bulgaria gave the go-ahead for the project. the last transit country to do so. >> this project has the political support of all partner countries. all have signed the contracts and taken their
the government in cairo; paul krugman on the stalemate over taxes and spending; the ongoing cholera epidemic in haiti; and american military leadership. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. mili
in michigan and in washington, d.c. with the author of "shadow bosses: how government. employee unions control america and rob taxpayers blind." mallory factor joins us. also tonight, egypt's president, muhammad morsi, ordering the egyptian military to arrest people in the street even as he claimed to have rescinded the dictatorial powers he assumed which have spurred violent demonstrations. and a new intelligence report concludes that america's time as the lone superpower is nearing an end. former director of national intelligence john negro panty joins us to talk about our future as a superpower and the challenges that we'll surely face. we begin tonight with one of the few scheduling misadventures of president obama's swire tenure in -- entire tenure in office. the president speaking to autoworkers outside detroit today, a day before governor snyder will sign michigan's newly-passed right-to-work law into effect. the president standing firmly with the unions that worked hard to get him reelected. >> what we shouldn't do, i just gotta say this, what we shouldn't be doing is try to take away
: the syrian government confirming it's getting its chemical weapons ready and may use it. the assad regime prepared the nerve gas sarin and loaded it. martha: i'm martha maccallum. president obama is warning assad that the whole world is watching his actions very closely, and if he were to use chemical weapons on his own people, it would clearly have large consequences for him. bill: secretary of state hillary clinton called an emergency meeting with the pentagon. >> the pentagon has contingency plans for everything including the chemical attack. it's believed according to a u.s. source that syria has put this sarin fast into cannisters that could be dropped from planes. these cannisters are designed to fracture so the devastating nerve gas could escape. but it's not known whether syria intends to use those chemical weapons. we think we have it in aerosol form. the u.s. is making contingency plans in case bashar al-asaad leaves the country suddenly and flees somewhere for asylum which would leave a vacuum there. several countries in that region are trying to find a place for assad to go. s
's grave for the obvious fact that we believe that the assad government has weapononized chemical and biological agents and put them in a position where they can be used fairly rapidly. as you look back over the 20 months of this conflict, this follows a series of events, one leading to the other which people said could not happen. this began, remember, with peaceful demonstrations. and when assad was unable to control them or suppress, he began to fire on his own people and they began to defend themselves in a very unfair fight which everyone thought we should take sides on the side of freedom and give the freedom fighters the weapons with which they could fight. it happened much too late. and people said, at least he's not using his air force to attack his own people and then he began to attack his own people from the air. now more than 40,000 killed. so when we see the government of assad weaponize chemical and biological agents and put them in bombs, we know this is a leader with no limits and unfortunately he follows his father who proved capable of using weapons against his
to the government in beijing. it is every writer's dream. 57-year-old mo yan was presented prize for literature by the swedish king. the academy praised his works for combining hallucinatory realism with chinese folk tales from a history, and contemporary life. but it was a controversial decision. critics accuse mo of acting as a mouthpiece for the chinese government. the author sparked controversy at reading recently when he compared censorship in his country to the inconvenient, but necessary security checks at airports. the awards or medicine, physics, chemistry, and economics went to eight winners from the u.s., japan, france, and britain. >> the nobel prize for economics was jointly awarded to allan ross and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand -- alvin roth and lloyd shapley for their work on matching supply and demand. 89-year-old lloyd shapley, professor emeritus at the university of california, received a standing ovation. >> while the eu is celebrating winning the nobel peace prize, one of its largest member states has been plunged into crisis. >> first data appe
and do share the opinion that the existing government in syria should carry out its functions, but time has shown its task is beyond its strength. back in washington, a spokesman for secretary clinton warned of the perils that the syrian people would confront even in a post assad era. >> we know these groups, al-qaeda and others, troy to take advantage of the environment assad has fostered over the last year or so. it is important that they -- that the syrian people get a government out of all of this that is representative of their desires and as separations. they -- aspirations. they don't want to trade one for the other. >> that has been a concern for u.s. policy makers in all of these mideast countries affected by the arab spring. >> what secretary clinton and most others are hoping is president assad will step down. any indication that might happen? >> judging on the pro nuns ments of his -- pronouncements of his top aids, no. they call the talk a pretext for foreign intervention. he equated the regime's potential use with suicide. >> the messages i conveyed from to the leaders of
it would be terrible. others predict tell actually be what this nation needs to begin to rein in government spending. will it? joining us is a former republican campaign manager and aide to the g.o.p. leadership. welcome. if this kicks in, in 23 days, will it be so dire or will it be the first step to budget reform? >> well, eric, i think the best thing that can happen for this nation in the long run is that we go over the fiscal cliff. will continue painful? yes, very painful. but i think that that is a pain -- it is only that pain that can hold these elected officials accountable and to act for responsibly. the reality is that, i have worked in in town 20 years, politics rules the day. the dose of reality, the pain, shut down of maybe -- shut down of the government services and operations. that type of pain, i think is the only thing that is going to, in the long run, get these folks in town to make sure this doesn't happen again and to act responsibly. as you said at the kickoff of this show, to really kind of look at these government programs and see if they are really necessary. >> you
the infrastructure in syria in tact. by destroying the infrastructure the governance of that country we allow libya to slip into chaos. we not allow it to happen in syria. best course of action is for us to not do that sort of thing. encourage him to leave. have the russians help us. clearly we have got to maintain that country as a sovereign effective good country with governance in some form. >> we don't have enough time to go through the country. talk about the countries going to play a vital role in whether this is solved peacefully or a bad let's talk about iran. let's talk about russia and let's talk about egypt which one is the king pin in this whole mess? >> rush sharks -- russia, period for syria anyway. base where they have ships coming into. they vin influence over both countries as we know the russians have been helping the iranians. egypt not so much. egypt has its own problems. iranians we are already in their face so to speak. sanctions. issues with elm this. russia is the king pin here. they can do the most good and the most harm. frankly, now if the represents are used they will ho
, it will be difficult to convince the u.s. government to change the way it has done business over the last 30 years -- some of that is necessary. the task is, how do you play the right role of engaging here? it is not naively giving money to liberal groups and not having a strategy. i believe this is a significant task inside egypt. it is an encouraging sign -- this is my prediction, it is going to force islamist political parties, at least elements of it to change their ideology. if the system remains open, if there is a big debate, i did not see it going backwards in terms of the diversity in egypt. it is hard for me to imagine that going backwards. >> we're going to move toward closing remarks. we will go in reverse order. bret you can have your two minutes. >> 1979, an influential article was written, dictatorships and double standards. he argued -- in a position of find myself increasingly attracted to -- the united states is better served secular authoritarian regimes against totalitarian alternatives. totalitarian alternatives, then as now, often becomes a power by means of democratic or pop
versus the federal government. you have colorado and washington saying we're going ahead with pot being a-okay, but it's a federal crime. what is the federal government going to do? could they shut it all down? >> reporter: this is the $64 billion question, what is the federal government going to do? the only thing thegsd so far is they're reviewing the laws in both states. they're going to sit back and see how they implement it and see where they can go from there. they reminded both states pot is illegal on the federal level. the concern is when you create havens of legal pot in colorado and here in washington state, and you have a black market around them, what's going to be the effect? are these going to be magnets for illegal pot? are you going to have problems on the border and lots of pot out there? it's not clear right now. they're waiting to see how it goes. >> thanks very much to miguel. appreciate it. miguel is talking about marijuana and it got us thinking about the war on drugs. it cost this country more than a trillion dollars since it was launched by president nixon as the
in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just passed tax cuts for the middle class americans and then fight later on for spending cuts and increasing taxes for the wealthy? caller: the tax cut for the general population is great. that would be good for stimulating the economy. but the big thing is hit there needs to be a balanced plan. we need more revenue and we need less spending at the federal level. what is good for california is not good for virginia and what's good for virginia is not good for maryland. maybe we need to focus on reducing the federal government overview. been there would not be as much spending or taxes needed. then let the states deal with the taxes they need to take care of their citizens. host: robert, milwaukee, democratic caller. caller: i would like to say that the republican party, not all of them, i think it's just the tea party, they are destroying the republi
last point is the u.s. writ large, the government and also civil society organization and others are largely standing on the sideline here. bob's organization put out an excellent report last week people should look at my organization. usip data private study. right now u.s. policy, also civil society and others were sitting on the sidelines here or there was a desire among local forces including younger islamists who want to bring about changes in their political movement in for the large purse sitting on the sidelines here we need to do more. >> we need to move on to the q&a portion here. a few questions from the audience. if you have a question, research and peer to microphone circulating. 10 minutes before we begin to wrap a. >> my name is -- [inaudible] -- washington d.c. what's missing on discussions is the fact that islamists have nothing to offer except for sharia law and muslims are fed up with the sharia law. the other point is there's a new new generation of arabs that face the people. i wrote an article about this, who are very different than their fathers and grandfa
will require islamists when exposed to the public, will force and to pay the heavy price of governing. in egypt we see that already. much in the same way that in the next couple of weeks in this town we will see some ideologues, see their ideology tested. grover norquist -- both ways. political forces, wherever their ideology is grounded, as long as the system remains open tand pluralistic, but will be forced -- we see this in indonesia. in 2002, the islamist parties got 41% of the vote. the decline over the last couple of years to about 29%. i believe we are in the early stages of transformation in the middle east. we will talk about that complex competition for power. a final point -- i hope we debated a little bit. it is the issue of u.s. policy. it is my view that two years into this transition in the middle east -- and i avoid calling it arab awakening or arab spring. it is too early to characterize it. we've only seen about four countries, senior leaderships' change. -- seen their leadership's change. how we actually change and adapt and become more nimble, both in terms of how we deal wi
modern-day slavery, subsidized by our government with taxpayer money. it's reprehensible. but for me, the number-one issue here is the safety of our american troops on these bases. that safety is compromised if our bases are filled with unauthorized, potentially unsafe foreign workers. and that's why i introduced the end trafficking in government contracting act of treft which provides the -- of 2012 which provides the most comprehensive approach taken. it is bipartisan legislation which now is included in the bill which passed the senate last week and i'm hopeful will be retained in conference and signed into law soon, with strong bipartisan support from my colleague, senator portman, of ohio. in addition, i want to thank senator leahy for advancing the trafficking victims reauthorization protection act known by tvpra which takes a an even more inclusive view this have problem to make sure america stands against human trafficking rather than complicit in it. the second issue that i want to raise is the violence against women act which continues to be stalled in the house of represen
will be voted on and gen final approval tomorrow and be sgned into law by govern rick snyder. michigan becomes the 24th state in the nation to ratify a aw that protects workers from being forced to pay union dues a a condition of their employment. we'll be examining tonight what's happening inichigan and in washington, d.c. with the author of "shadow bosses: how government. employee unions control america and rob taxpayer blind." llory factor joins us. also tonight, egypt's president, muhammad morsi, ordering the egan military to arrest people in the street even as he claimed to have rescinded the ctatorial powers he assumed which have spurre violent demonstrations. and a new intelligence report concludes that america's time as the lone perpower is nearing an end. former director of national intelligence jo negro panty joins us to talk about our future as a superpower and the challenges that we'll surely face we begin tonight with one of the few scheduling misadventures of president obama'swire tenure in -- entire tenure in office. e president speaking to autoworkers outside detroit today, ad
pennsylvania. >> woodruff: we examine an almost $2 billion government settlement with british bank hsbc over charges of money laundering for the nation of iran and mexican drug cartels. >> suarez: jeffrey brown profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these insti
the world. a number of countries are still trying to settle into new systems of government. in egypt, the new political system is facing a crisis. the main opposition coalition has called for mass protests on tuesday. that is is by president morsi's decision to annul a decree which gave him sweeping powers. there was a plan -- they want him to drop plans for referendum on a new constitution as well. >> [no audio] this was the place where defiance against the dictator to cold. the activists all around here -- took hold. the activists are all around here. the target of their defiance is an elected president. what they are worried about is this new constitution that was it sped through a process and the referendum on it that is due to be held. the president, mohamed morsi, says it will be held on saturday. the opposition says it will stand firm. it does not want the referendum. it thinks the constitution is a flawed document. george.fraid we lost we will try to get him back. one of the opposition leaders has been speaking about the situation. we can hear what he had to say. >> we are no
months ago to take basic control of the government, but it's not popular across all of egypt and there are groups that want to see it replaced with something more moderate. those groups continue to protest and they say they will continue to take up time and continue to go to tahrir square and alexandria and others as well and we could see the beginning of a long-term protest movement in cairo and across egypt. >> thank you for that update. >> jamie: and this fox news alert, a major break in the investigation into the terror attack in benghazi, libya. authorities in egypt arresting this man in cairo, mohammed ahmad. he's identified as the alleged ring leader of an al-qaeda-linked group that is suspected of taking part in the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate where ambassador chris stevens and three other americans were killed. u.s. intelligence reportedly take part in the capture. molly henneberg has more for us from washington. >> hi, jamie, a leader in the terror world, ambitious and very dangerous and now, egyptian authorities aided have him. and the u.s. official
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 286 (some duplicates have been removed)